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Volume 65, Issue 2

Front Cover by Daisy Quezada Ureña
Untitled (detail) 2018
Porcelain and clothesline in Wuhan Student Dormitory
500 Sq. Ft.

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Introduction

“AN OLD MAN in great trouble . . .” Folks who know me, or those who have followed these intros over recent years, won’t be surprised to see me returning to Beckett, my go-to author ever since I first stumbled onto Godot, back in my undergrad days. Never left that crossroads. Here, though, I’m citing a lesser-known play, Embers, mainly because, while putting together our Summer TOC, its phrases kept rattling around in my brain: “back against the hangings, hand stretched out widening the chink, looking out, white world, great trouble, not a...

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poetry

Men

Mitchell Jacobs

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Broadsides

2024 Winner of the Anne Halley Poetry Prize

Congratulations to MICHAEL LAVERS, winner of this year's Anne Halley Poetry Prize!

Nathan McClain and Abigail Chabitnoy have selected Michael Lavers' poem "Sun, Birds, and Leaves" from MR's Summer 2023 issue (Vol. 64, Issue 2) for the prestigious prize.

MICHAEL LAVERS is the author of After Earth and The Inextinguishable, both published by the University of Tampa Press. His poems have appeared in ...


MR Jukebox

Nathan McClain and Abigail Chabitnoy have selected Michael Lavers' poem "Sun, Birds, and Leaves" from MR's Summer 2023 issue (Vol. 64, Issue 2) for the prestigious prize.

MICHAEL LAVERS is the author of After Earth and The Inextinguishable, both published by the University of Tampa Press. His poems have appeared in Ploughshares, AGNI, Southwest Review, Best New Poets 2015, TriQuarterly, The Georgia Review, and elsewhere. He has been awarded the University of Canberra Vice-Chancellor's International Poetry Prize, the Moth Poetry Prize, and the Bridport Poetry Prize. Together with his wife, the musician and artist Claire Åkebrand, and their two children, he lives in Provo, Utah, and teaches at Brigham Young University.

 

“We are the heirs of a legacy of creative protest [...] the teachings of Thoreau are alive today, indeed, they are more alive today than ever before.”

—REV. MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. (MR 4.1, Autumn 1962)

From the Blog

Colloquies

Vogliamo Tutto

- By SABINE BROECK

Vogliamo Tutto

Since I wrote “Staatsraison: Dispatch From Germany” six months ago, Germany has seen an avalanche of staatsraison attacks, supported across the political spectrum. These attacks have often been mobilized and led by representatives of the Deutsche Israelische Gesellschaft, the journal Jüdische Allgemeine, and by Zionist factions of Jewish communities in Germany, including youth groups and student leaders. With the rise of the Green Party, the post-1968 generation...


Interviews

10 Questions for Chen Po-Yu

- By Franchesca Viaud

You were a wooden coat hanger.
Your body, half-clothed. No hat could alter your looks.
No gentleman’s hat that tipped to highlight
Your smile. You were an exquisite gentleman’s
Coat hanger, with pale skinny arms growing upward.

The wood grain was fading, paler and paler.
The winter, too, was half-clothed. No gentleman’s hat
Could disguise the looks of the past.
No gentleman could. No black gentleman’s hat could.
The gentleman who kept a cat
Could wait at a station in winter.
Like a tree that grew paler and paler, leaves falling.
from "Coat Hanger," Volume 65, Issue 1 (Spring 2024)

Tell us about one of the first pieces you wrote.
One of the...


Our America

Critical Counterinsurgency and Zionism

- By Kerry Sinanan

When the Tree rises up, the branches
Shall flourish green and fresh in the sun
The laughter of the Tree shall leaf
Beneath the sun
And birds shall return
Undoubtedly, the birds shall return.

            —Fadwa Tuqan, from “The Deluge and the Tree”

 

The very title of Adam Shatz’s most recent, unfortunate piece of writing announces itself clearly as Zionist apologia. “Israel’s Descent” invokes Charles Darwin’s The Descent...


blog

“Some Sing”: A Juneteenth Celebration at the Lincoln Center

- By Carl Hancock Rux

Presented here is Carl Hancock Rux's Artist Statement for his forthcoming Juneteenth celebration at Lincoln Center

"It was while singing... the idea of escaping from slavery was first suggested to my mind." —Frederick Douglass

African American music is inseparable from the Transatlantic Slave Trade and the forced transportation of millions of African people across the Atlantic, who were then subjected to slavery. The cultures from which they were torn and the conditions into which they were forced both contributed to the sounds of African American music. Many of the instruments historically used in African American music, including the...



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