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Interviews

10 Questions for Donna Lee Miele

- By Edward Clifford

Above the pitted black coast, at the house that looks accidentally built, the floodlights have been left on. The owner is not there. He only comes during the winter, when the waves rise and he can pick his way down the cliff to ride the surf off the reef, some two hundred yards offshore. Now, in summertime, the ocean is sleepy under round, slow swells that gently slap the cliff.
—from “A Breath of Plankton Soup,” Volume 62, Issue 1 (Spring 2021)

Tell us about one of the first pieces you wrote.
The very first story I wrote, of which I was really proud, was about a Thanksgiving dinner involving woodland animals of the Hudson Valley (illustrated, of course). But if you want to fast-forward past that one, through the 8th...


Interviews

10 Questions for Daniel Barnum

- By Edward Clifford

in 1980, my father saw my mother’s photo in a magazine, then
     left connecticut.

road-tripped to meet her where she lived in arizona. who would
     stay in connecticut?
—from “Qui Transtulit Sustinet,” Volume 62, Issue 2 (Spring 2021)

Tell us about one of the first pieces you wrote.
How far back are we going? In first grade, I wrote and illustrated a story about my cats, Rosie and Marmalade, going on a road trip to visit my extended family in the southwest. One night, they went out camping out in the desert, then woke up the next morning and realized that, exhausted and surrounded by the spare landscape’s utter darkness, they’d set up their tent at...


Interviews

10 Questions for Gloria L. Huang

- By Edward Clifford

The glass under her forearms was smudged with cloudy fingerprints. An ant wandered aimlessly across the counter, island-hopping from one oily smear to another. She watched as it shuffled, the quick movements of its legs and constant swivels of its antennae creating the impression of a creature lost and blind. Is it thinking? she wondered. Does it know I'm here?
—from "Scattered Islands," Volume 62, Issue 1 (Spring 2021)

Tell us about one of the first pieces you wrote.
“First” first? I’ve been writing stories since I was a child, but I assume you don’t want to hear about my third-grade story “Mr. Tabblesworth The Cat Drives to the City”. (Or do you?) One of the first stories I had...


Interviews

10 Questions for Rose B. Simpson

- By Edward Clifford

I studied flamenco for a few years when I was an undergraduate. I had signed up, hoping for an easy credit. On the first day, the teacher showed a class of sixty what kind of shoes we needed; the ones with the nails hammered into a small dome on the two-inch heel and shiny black toe. a skirt made with miles of pleated stretchy black fabric to wrap tight around our hips as we brandished them across the floor.
—from "Mata la Araña," Volume 61, Issue 4 (Winter 2020)

Tell us about one of the first pieces you wrote.
I started undergrad at the University of New Mexico in 2001. One of the first stories I wrote to be workshopped was called “Ladybug,” and it was about a jungle love affair between two women in active duty. In...


Interviews

10 Questions for Suzanne S. Rancourt

- By Edward Clifford

Nowhere an Uber or Lyft
I wondered about fate and taxis

counted seconds to minutes to years since
I last looked at this watch

Dirt, long since thrown upon graves and caskets
their resonant thuds quelled
—from "I was hurried, not agitated," from Volume 61, Issue 4 (Winter 2020)

Tell us about one of the first pieces you wrote.
My first memory of creative writing is this: I was probably somewhere between 3 and 4 years old at the age where a child begins to scribble in a clear up and down motion. In Developmental Psych, it’s referred to as emergent literacy. I specifically remember using a blue Bic pen (the kind that advertisements strap onto figure skates, skated about a bit and then wrote with the...


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