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   Front Cover:
   Dorothy Iannone
   Flora and Fauna (detail), 1973
   Felt pen on Bristol board, 23.5 x 28.5 in.

   Introduction
   “LADIES FIRST!” This phrase today, perhaps more
   than the custom it refers to, sounds off, ill-advised,
   antiquated at best. One can hardly imagine a native
   speaker — and it would be a man, wouldn’t it? —
   uttering it at all, except humorously or with thinly
   veiled hostility. . . .

   Loud, a story by Elizabeth Denton
   I admit it: I wrote a story that was kind of about my
   sister-in-law, Sue. Story got published in a pretty good
   literary magazine. Who knew it would also be available
   online for my brother and parents to see? . . .

   Spiritual Evaluation, a poem by Taije Silverman
   Did you want this baby?
   There are a certain number of questions you may pass over
   without forfeiting your score on the test. . . .

   Food Work, an essay by Siobhan Phillips
   I’ve been through two food movements now. I keep
   mixing them up. I keep getting mixed up in them.
   Which is my mother’s and which is mine. Whether they
   might be both and whether they can be neither. . . .

   Time Merchants, a story by Daniele del Giudice, 
     translated by Elizabeth Harris and Louise Rozier

   Yesterday I witnessed something I’d never seen before,
   a business transaction concerning time. Or at least that’s
   what I think I saw going on in a small shop, a little hole-
   in-the-wall on the west side of Medina that you get to from
   Rue des Consuls. . . .

   Walk, a poem by Tim Seibles
   Dusk in the body,
   starlight near the heart.

   One half-lit street
   heading into night: now . . .

   The Vermin, a story by Amir Ahmadi Arian
   Dear Sir:
   This morning you came to visit me in prison for the fifth time
   and I rejected your services again. I am writing this so that
   you stop wasting your time. . . .

   Clemente’s Overzealous Romp: Roberto Clemente
     and Baseball as Theater, an essay by Martín Espada

   On july 25th, 1956, Roberto Clemente did a terrible, wonderful
   thing. In his sophomore year with the Pittsburgh Pirates,
   Clemente came to bat with the bases loaded, nobody out, and
   his team trailing the Chicago Cubs 8-5 in the bottom of the
   ninth at Forbes Field. . . .

   On Dorothy Iannone, an essay by Trinie Dalton
  
Dorothy is my education — I place myself in her path and
   experience beauty each time, am changed by that beauty.
   I’ve been attempting to write an essay of reasonable length
   about Dorothy’s artwork for eight months, since I went to
   Berlin to studio visit and interview her about art for an
   upcoming book project. . .

   Advice, a poem by Kristin Latour
   A dog will not bite your hand
   if a window is half open to the rain.
   He will sit facing a breeze, drops of water
   on his nose. Wise is the woman with open windows, . . .